Free Ground Shipping on Orders Over $250 (Where Ground is Available).

FAQs

Shipping & Delivery 

What will I receive in my family meal?

The contents of the family meal are selected based on the inventory we currently have in stock and can include a combination of the items listed on our product page, but does not guarantee that you will receive all of those items. We do this to help balance all the cuts that come off of an animal and to ensure no part of the animal goes to waste!

When will my item ship?

Orders usually ship in 48 business hours, however, given the extra precautions around COVID-19, we are running a little slower than normal. We'll send you updates once your order ships! We ship all items via FedEx. 

Order cut offs are 5pm for next day shipping with all orders placed after 5pm on Thursday shipping the following Monday. We will try to ship orders after 5pm the next day if we can. 


Why didn't I have a shipping option?

Depending on where you live, we may have taken care of that for you. Certain zip codes require standard overnight shipping so that we can make sure your meat arrives fresh.

Where can I find my package? 

Please note that we work with FedEx to offer contactless delivery service during this time. This means that FedEx may not ring your doorbell when the package arrives. Make sure you check your front step to grab your package! 


Why don't you have more items for sale?

We work directly with local farmers, whose preference is to sell whole animals, as managing inventory and selling individual cuts is not part of their job description. This problem is called carcass balancing and its quite difficult to manage. While we buy whole animals, over 40% of the 625 lb. animal is ground beef. The more ground beef we can sell, the more inventory we can invest in, and the more products we can list. That's why we say ground beef rules. 

Meats & Cooking

My beef didn't arrive frozen! Is it okay to eat or refreeze it?

Yes! We ship almost all of our beef frozen, but in some instances it's shipped fresh. This happens when demand is really high and we don't even have a chance to freeze it before sending it out. Even if your beef was shipped frozen, it is possible that it'll arrive thawed, especially if you selected two-day shipping or it is warmer than 60 degrees outside. Never fear, though! Per the USDA, thawed beef is perfectly safe to refreeze. Or just go ahead and toss it in your fridge if you plan on eating it in the next couple of days. The most important thing is to check if the temperature of the meat is below 40 degree. Our packaging is designed to ensure that it is with two-day shipping, but no harm in double checking!


My meat looks a little brown... can I eat it?
 
In almost all situations, yes! While quite unappealing looking, the brown color comes from harmless oxidation. Once you open up the package and take the meat out, it will "bloom" and should get it's red hue back after 10-15 minutes. However, in the very unlikely case that the meat smells bad at all after that time or you see any green coloration then toss it and contact us for a refund. All of the meat you receive is either shipped out immediately after packaging or frozen, absolutely none of it should be unsafe to eat.

 

How long can I refrigerate or freeze my meat?

As a general rule of thumb, use fresh ground beef or burgers within three days and use whole muscle cuts (steaks, roasts) within one week. You can safely freeze vacuum-sealed meat for a year (or more!), but the quality will degrade over time, especially if freezer burn sets in. Overall, just trust your nose! Fifteen minutes after taking your meat out of the vacuum seal give it a sniff - if it smells sour, don't eat it. Some browning, which is especially common on ground beef, is not a bad thing, but rather a sign of harmless oxidation. Any green coloration is an immediate red flag.

Why do packages have different labels? 

You might receive meat that is labeled differently. That's not a mistake. It's a result of us working with three different processors. Each partner we have allows us to access different regions of Pennsylvania. It's important to us that the animals we purchase don't spend too much time in transport, so the farmers can transport their animals to our closest processing partner. The processors we work with are also listed here - Rising Spring Meats, Reed Brook Custom Meats and Smucker's Meats.

I love your blog but want to know even more about meat and cooking it, where can I go?

Cooking meat can seem daunting with all the different cuts, but once you get a few methods down, you'll never be intimidated again! Here are a few resources that'll help you build that confidence. If you own only one meat book, we'd recommend the River Cottage Meat Book by Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall. Not only does it have recipes for all kinds of cuts, but the first 200 or so pages are just devoted to talking about meat generally. For some industry-sponsored help, check out Beef: It's What's For Dinner. They have every cut of beef listed by their many names and also links to recipes for each cut. Both Bon Appetit and The New York Times have great curated recipes if you're just trying to get straight to the point and cook some damn good meat!

 


About Our Meat

Where does your meat come from?

All of our meat is sourced from Pennsylvania, mostly around the Happy Valley. We buy only whole animals to uphold the farmer-centric portion of our mission - let them focus on farming and us focus on moving a whole animal. You can see a list of all the farmers we work with here.

What are your welfare guidelines?
 
Animal mistreatment is rampant within the livestock industry and we want to set common sense and high welfare precedents. We partnered with the ASPCA to develop our welfare guidelines, which all our farmers have signed onto. We've already had our biggest suppliers and processors undergo third-party certification with Certified Humane and have committed to have all certified by the end of 2021. Read more about our welfare guidelines here.

What did your beef eat?
 
Our beef are fed a mixed diet of grass and grain. We allow our farmers flexibility in their feeding regimens, since they're farmers and we're city slickers. However, all farmers raise their animals on pasture for the large majority of their lives, only adding grain into their diet as they enter the "finishing" stage of their lives. This influx of energy and protein rich grains helps to keep the farm operations financially viable, as the animals reach their target weights much faster.

If you have other questions that we did not answer, please contact us directly.